VMW Monthly - November 2009 - ISSN 1388-722X



Virtual Medical Worlds is a monthly Virtual Magazine on Telemedicine and High Performance Computing and Networking for readers interested in computer applications in medical environments. VMW is produced by an editorial team composed of professionals in publishing, and an advisory board with professionals in telemedicine, providing the embedding into the everyday practice and research. Check out the VMW Web site for the calendar of events, the various services, and the friendly advertising rates.

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*** Highlights from the International Supercomputing Conference 2009 in Hamburg ***

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Contents November 2009 Issue

 
Cross-Atlantic state-of-the-art
 
NASA technology key component of new diagnostic aid from DynaDx
Hyper-SAGE boosts remote MRI sensitivity
$4,8 million stimulus grant launches feasibility study of massive endeavour to measure all human proteins
Aurora Health Care among six sites chosen for national Medicare collaborative on geriatric care
M.D. Anderson team chosen to help navigate Cancer Genome Atlas
 
Grid for Health
 
Award targets brain tumour research
Systems Biology Ireland uses HP technology to advance therapeutic treatments
University of Florida receives $12,2 million to establish national network of scientists
Using synthetic evolution to study the brain: Researchers model key part of neurons
Scientists use world's fastest supercomputer to create the largest HIV evolutionary tree
 
Healthcare compunetics
 
Pioneering work on cell-phone imaging could transform global health care
iPhone the body electric
Georgia Tech Research Institute is developing protocols for testing effects of RFID systems on medical devices
Major research collaboration will improve British athletes' performance on world stage
Cell phones become handheld tools for global development
 
Industrial Chemist's Corner
 
GE Healthcare launches eHealth business and continues advancement of nuclear medicine
Perot Systems to establish health care information technology in China and Jordan
IBM Research aims to build nanoscale DNA sequencer to help drive down cost of personalized genetic analysis
Philips brings the digital revolution to the pathology laboratory
Carestream Health is shipping 10,000th point-of-care CR system and launches web-based cardiology PACS and portable wireless detector
 
Planet Europe in Action
 
Biosensor to help enlist cancer resistance fighters?
Video camera that records at the speed of thought
Impressions from the Twelfth European Health Forum Gastein
IOCOM supports telemedicine project for NHS to save more than 100 lives a year
TraDIS technique tackles typhoid: First high-throughput functional analysis of every Salmonella Typhi gene
 
The 21st century hospital
 
Garrahan Hospital enriches telemedecine experience with Cisco Technology and Telefónica Connection
Glowpoint empowers hospital patients with second opinions via HD video and exclusive TEN service
Innovative statewide UC Medical Center collaboration targets breast cancer
University of Texas Southwestern patient first in North Texas to receive newest-generation heart failure device
Forsyth Medical Center launches region's first comprehensive teleneurology programme
 
Virtual snap shots
 
Dutch health research consortium obtains 22,5 million euro for biobanking initiative
Crushing cigarettes in a virtual reality environment reduces tobacco addiction
'ECG for the mind' could diagnose depression in an hour
Health information exchange conquers new frontier: Emergency medical services
Case Western Reserve University scientist builds imager that identifies and locates individual cancer cells
 
VMWC news bites
 
7thSense in rhythm with Chicago Museum of Science and Industry Giant Heart
University of Delaware teams with Jefferson to win defense grant for imaging system
Virtual solution to driving phobias
Is my robot happy to see me?
European hospitals test anaesthetists' skills on computers, not people, using SensAble's haptic devices
 

Leads November 2009 Issue

 
Cross-Atlantic state-of-the-art
 
NASA technology key component of new diagnostic aid from DynaDx
Full ArticleNASA technology will now be available to the medical community to help in the diagnosis and prediction of syndromes that affect the brain, such as stroke, dementia, and traumatic brain injury. DynaDx Corporation of Mountain View, California has released the Multimodal Pressure-Flow (MMPF) technique for analysis of dynamic cerebral autoregulation - the ability of cerebral vessels to maintain a constant blood flow despite changes in arterial blood pressure - that incorporates the Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) technology licensed from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.
Hyper-SAGE boosts remote MRI sensitivity
Full ArticleA new technique in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) dubbed "Hyper-SAGE" has the potential to detect ultra low concentrations of clinical targets, such as lung and other cancers. Development of Hyper-SAGE was led by one of the world's foremost authorities on MRI technology, Alexander Pines, a chemist who holds joint appointments with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California, Berkeley. The key to this technique is xenon gas that has been zapped with laser light to "hyperpolarize" the spins of its atomic nuclei so that most are pointing in the same direction.
$4,8 million stimulus grant launches feasibility study of massive endeavour to measure all human proteins
Full ArticleAn expert in cancer proteomics at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center has received $4,8 million in federal stimulus funding from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to co-lead a pilot study to assess the feasibility and scalability of a project that aims to measure all of the proteins in the human body.
Aurora Health Care among six sites chosen for national Medicare collaborative on geriatric care
Full ArticleAurora Health Care is one of only six health care sites in the United States invited by the Mount Sinai School of Medicine and Johns Hopkins University to participate in the Medicare Innovations Collaborative, an effort to shape health care for senior citizens nationwide by applying best practices in geriatrics.
M.D. Anderson team chosen to help navigate Cancer Genome Atlas
Full ArticleThe Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) will fund an effort by scientists at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center to siphon buckets of meaningful information from an ocean of data about the aberrant genetics that drive human cancers.
 
Grid for Health
 
Award targets brain tumour research
Full ArticleSAIC-Frederick Inc., under its prime contract with the National Cancer Institute (NCI), has named the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) as one of five national centres selected to conduct cancer experiments using advanced computer simulations. The award of the "In Silico Research Centers of Excellence" contract partners TGen with 5AM Solutions, a Virginia-based life science software development firm. The award of $691.930 for the first 12-months includes two 12-month option periods that if executed amount to an additional $1.373.582 for a total of $2.065.512 over three years. The Center of Excellence will use computer tools developed as part of the NCI Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG), which is a data-sharing network for researchers, physicians and patients. The caBIG programme is designed to accelerate methods for detecting, diagnosing, treating and preventing cancer.
Systems Biology Ireland uses HP technology to advance therapeutic treatments
Full ArticleHP is collaborating with Systems Biology Ireland (SBI) on life sciences research aimed at providing a powerful new way to use the strength of computers and mathematics to understand biology. The SBI research programme, enabled by HP scale-out storage technology, seeks to unravel the complexities of cells through the use of models that predict biological behaviour.
University of Florida receives $12,2 million to establish national network of scientists
Full ArticleImagine a website like Facebook, but instead of using it to share videos or post quizzes like "What '80s song are you?" scientists could scour a national network of researchers, only a few mouse clicks separating them from information needed for a scientific breakthrough. That's the goal of a $12,2 million National Center for Research Resources grant awarded to the University of Florida and collaborators at Cornell University, Indiana University, Weill Cornell Medical College, Washington University in St. Louis, the Scripps Research Institute and the Ponce School of Medicine in Puerto Rico. The funding stems from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.
Using synthetic evolution to study the brain: Researchers model key part of neurons
Full ArticleThe human brain has evolved over millions of years to become a vast network of billions of neurons and synaptic connections. Understanding it is one of humankind's greatest pursuits. But to understand how the brain processes information, researchers must first understand the very basics of neurons - even down to how proteins inside the neurons act to change the neuron's voltage. To do so requires a balance of experimentation and computer modelling - a partnership across disciplines traversed by Bill Kath, professor of engineering sciences and applied mathematics in the McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science, and Nelson Spruston, professor of neurobiology and physiology in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences.
Scientists use world's fastest supercomputer to create the largest HIV evolutionary tree
Full ArticleSupporting Los Alamos National Laboratory's role in the international Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology (CHAVI) consortium, researchers are using the Roadrunner supercomputer to analyze vast quantities of genetic sequences from HIV infected people in the hope of zeroing in on possible vaccine target areas.
 
Healthcare compunetics
 
Pioneering work on cell-phone imaging could transform global health care
Full ArticleCell phones have come a long way in the last decade. Today, one can talk, text message, shoot photos and video, send and receive e-mail, and even access the Web. Now imagine a cell phone that can be used to monitor diseases like HIV or malaria and to test water quality after a major disaster like a hurricane or earthquake. Aydogan Ozcan, assistant professor of electrical engineering at the University of California - Los Angeles' (UCLA) Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, has been working to make this cell phone-turned-mobile medical lab a reality. The proliferation of such devices could alter the direction of health care in the developing world, as well as in industrialized nations, in the next several years.
iPhone the body electric
Full ArticleUniversity of Utah researchers created new iPhone programmes - known as applications or "apps" - to help scientists, students, doctors and patients study the human body, evaluate medical problems and analyze other three-dimensional images.
Georgia Tech Research Institute is developing protocols for testing effects of RFID systems on medical devices
Full ArticleRadio frequency identification (RFID) systems are widely used for applications that include inventory management, package tracking, toll collection, passport identification and airport luggage security. More recently, these systems have found their way into medical environments to track patients, equipment assets and staff members. However, there is currently no published standardized, repeatable methodology by which manufacturers of RFID equipment or medical devices can assess potential issues with electromagnetic interference and evaluate means to mitigate them. To resolve these concerns, the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) recently began developing testing protocols for RFID technology in the health care setting. The test protocol development is being overseen by AIM Global, the international trade association representing automatic identification and mobility technology solution providers, and also includes MET Laboratories, a company that provides testing and certification services for medical devices.
Major research collaboration will improve British athletes' performance on world stage
Full ArticleScientists are developing a range of miniaturised wearable and track-side sensors, computer modelling tools and smart training devices to help British athletes improve their performance on the world stage, as part of a new GBP 8,5 million project that is officially launched on 28 October 2009. The Elite Sport Performance Research in Training with Pervasive Sensing (ESPRIT) project is funded by the EPSRC and is led by Imperial College London in partnership with UK Sport and supported by Queen Mary University of London and Loughborough University. It involves researchers from the three universities working alongside British athletes via UK Sport's Research and Innovation programme.
Cell phones become handheld tools for global development
Full ArticleMobile phones are on the verge of becoming powerful tools to collect data on many issues, ranging from global health to the environment. Computer scientists at the University of Washington have used Android, the open-source mobile operating system championed by Google, to turn a cell phone into a versatile data-collection device. Organisations that want a fully customizable way to, say, snap pictures of a deforested area, add the location co-ordinates and instantly submit that information to a global environmental database now have a flexible and free way to do it.
 
Industrial Chemist's Corner
 
GE Healthcare launches eHealth business and continues advancement of nuclear medicine
Full ArticleGE Healthcare, a unit of General Electric Company, has launched Discovery NM/CT 670, a hybrid imaging platform designed to improve work flow, dose management, and overall image quality, in Europe. The company has also launched eHealth, a new business unit offering enhanced connectivity to clinicians and patients designed with data privacy and security features to enable health information sharing that can help increase efficiency, reduce error and improve health outcomes.
Perot Systems to establish health care information technology in China and Jordan
Full ArticlePerot Systems Corporation has signed a health care information technology agreement with the Changsha Municipal Government in the Hunan Province of China. The agreement calls for Perot Systems to develop a plan for a city-wide Regional Health Information Platform, and it includes co-ordination of planning for health care data centres and the creation of electronic health records (EHRs) for city residents. And the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, in a public demonstration hosted by His Majesty King Abdullah II, provided a stunning look at the new integrated health care technology system being implemented for the people of Jordan in the coming year. The project, named "Hakeem" to symbolize the National E-Health Programme in Jordan, is managed by the Jordanian non-profit agency Electronic Health Solutions, with technology implementation and integration provided by Perot Systems Corporation.
IBM Research aims to build nanoscale DNA sequencer to help drive down cost of personalized genetic analysis
Full ArticleIn an effort to build a nanoscale DNA sequencer, IBM scientists are drilling nano-sized holes in computer-like chips and passing DNA strands through them in order to read the information contained within their genetic code. This advanced research effort to demonstrate a silicon-based "DNA Transistor" could help pave the way to read human DNA easily and quickly, generating advancements in health condition diagnosis and treatment. The challenge in the effort is to slow and control the motion of the DNA through the hole so the reader can accurately decode what is in the DNA. If successful, the project could improve throughput and reduce cost to achieve the vision of personalized genome analysis at a cost of $100 to $1000. In comparison, the first sequencing ever done by the Human Genome Project (HGP) cost $3 billion.
Philips brings the digital revolution to the pathology laboratory
Full ArticleAt the College of American Pathologists 2009 annual meeting in Washington D.C., USA, Royal Philips Electronics is unveiling plans to develop integrated digital solutions for the medical pathology domain. Already a world expert in radiology information systems (RIS) and picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) for medical images generated, for example, in radiology and cardiology departments, Philips has now designed sophisticated digital pathology solutions to ease the workload and support decision making in central and hospital-based pathology departments.
Carestream Health is shipping 10,000th point-of-care CR system and launches web-based cardiology PACS and portable wireless detector
Full ArticleCarestream Health Inc. has made available its new web-based cardiology PACS that provides an efficient enterprise-wide image and information management solution for cardiology data. The CARESTREAM Cardiology PACS is now available in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, The Netherlands and Italy. The company also shipped its 10.000th KODAK Point-of-Care CR System and reports strong worldwide demand for these affordable, tabletop digital medical imaging systems.
 
Planet Europe in Action
 
Biosensor to help enlist cancer resistance fighters?
Full ArticleA powerful new biosensor developed by European researchers will help identify cells in the immune system that actively suppress tumour growth, then put them to use. Enlisting the patient's own immune system would be like sending reinforcements for resistance fighters. Cancer is a major killer and an intractable problem confronting medical science, but now European researchers have developed a biosensor that will help doctors to use the patient's own immune system to combat the disease. And during their work the Cochise team discovered that the breakthrough technology could be used in a host of other applications, from biotech, to green tech to industrial processes. The biosensor for cancer therapy was the primary focus of the group, however.
Video camera that records at the speed of thought
Full ArticleEuropean researchers who created an ultra-fast, extremely high-resolution video camera have enabled dozens of medical applications, including one scenario that can record "thought" processes travelling along neurons. This is ingenious science. The Megaframe project scored a staggering number of breakthroughs to create the world's first 1024 pixel, photon-resolution, million-frame-per-second CMOS camera that puts Europe firmly in the lead for ultra-high speed video cameras.
Impressions from the Twelfth European Health Forum Gastein
Full ArticleThe global economic crisis poses a massive threat to the stability of the public health care and social systems and to general access to health care services, warned leading experts speaking about this year's key theme of "Financial Crisis and Health Policy" at the European Health Forum Gastein (EHFG), that was held 30 September to 3 October 2009 as the leading health policy event in the European Union.
IOCOM supports telemedicine project for NHS to save more than 100 lives a year
Full ArticleFour hospitals in the east of England have begun piloting a new telemedicine project that will help make 24/7 stroke thrombolysis available to everyone in the region by next year. Once rolled out across the area the new service is expected to save more than 100 lives a year and enable many more people, who may otherwise have suffered long term disability from their stroke, to return home. The United Kingdom's National Health Service (NHS) is using IOCOM technology for its East of England telemedicine project.
TraDIS technique tackles typhoid: First high-throughput functional analysis of every Salmonella Typhi gene
Full ArticleFor the first time, researchers are able to look at the need for every gene in a bacterial cell in a single experiment. The new method will transform the study of gene activity and the search for weaknesses in bacterial armouries. Using a newly developed, next-gen sequencing method, a team established which genes Salmonella Typhi needs to survive and which are more of a luxury. The results and the method will be a boon to scientists tackling bacterial disease, allowing them to capitalize on the abundance of genomic sequence data from next-generation sequencing technologies.
 
The 21st century hospital
 
Garrahan Hospital enriches telemedecine experience with Cisco Technology and Telefónica Connection
Full ArticleCisco has implemented the second phase of a telemedicine pilot project, led by the Prof. Dr. Juan P. Garrahan Pediatric Hospital, Cisco and Telefónica, in co-operation with Castro Rendón Hospital. This multiphase project is geared to offering remote health care support and services in different provinces of the Argentine Republic.
Glowpoint empowers hospital patients with second opinions via HD video and exclusive TEN service
Full ArticleGlowpoint Inc., a provider of managed services for telepresence and video conferencing, has issued a case study that highlights three video collaboration applications in use at El Camino Hospital, a not-for-profit organisation with hospital campuses in Mountain View and Los Gatos, California. In one of the applications, El Camino Hospital utilizes Glowpoint's Telepresence interExchange Network (TEN) service for secure, high-quality network connectivity to provide patients with remote access to as many as 14 expert opinions. In addition to enabling more diagnosis options, the service also reduces travel costs for doctors and patients while increasing the overall quality of patient care.
Innovative statewide UC Medical Center collaboration targets breast cancer
Full ArticleThe Moores University of California San Diego (UCSD) Cancer Center is participating in an unprecedented statewide University of California collaboration to improve care for breast cancer patients by designing and testing new approaches to research, technology and health care delivery. Named the ATHENA Breast Health Network, the groundbreaking project will initially involve 150.000 women throughout California who will be screened for breast cancer and followed for decades through the five UC medical centres. ATHENA is a University of California system-wide project supported by a $5,3 million University of California grant, and by a $4,8 million grant from the Safeway Foundation.
University of Texas Southwestern patient first in North Texas to receive newest-generation heart failure device
Full ArticleUniversity of Texas (UT) Southwestern Medical Center patient Michael LeBlanc, 40, is the first in North Texas to receive the newest generation of a mechanical device designed to improve heart function. It will be his lifeline while he awaits a heart transplant. Called a left-ventricular assist device (LVAD), its purpose is to help a patient's weakened heart pump blood throughout the body. For Mr. LeBlanc, it will help his ailing heart continue to pump until the Irving resident receives a new heart. UT Southwestern is the only medical facility in North Texas implanting the HeartWare Ventricular Assist System as part of a national clinical trial testing the effectiveness of the device. The HeartWare Ventricular Assist System is a little smaller than a hockey puck and two and half times smaller than the earliest versions of LVADs.
Forsyth Medical Center launches region's first comprehensive teleneurology programme
Full ArticleRural and small, suburban hospitals in North Carolina and Virginia can now provide a higher level of emergency stroke and critical neurology care, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, as part of a new teleneurology medicine programme announced October 26, 2009, by Forsyth Medical Center (FMC). The programme, co-ordinated through the Forsyth Stroke & Neurosciences Center, allows medical staff at participating hospitals to rapidly connect with highly trained, board-certified neurologists using videoconferencing technology at the patient's bedside.
 
Virtual snap shots
 
Dutch health research consortium obtains 22,5 million euro for biobanking initiative
Full ArticleA Dutch consortium of health research groups has received 22,5 million euro from the Dutch government to establish a national biobanking infrastructure, named BBMRI-NL. Existing collections of valuable clinical material and data will be integrated and enriched in order to improve utility and access. The grant has been provided by the Dutch Ministry of Education through the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). Biobanking has been given high priority on the Dutch national roadmap for large research infrastructures. The evaluation committee has recommended further investment after the initial three year period.
Crushing cigarettes in a virtual reality environment reduces tobacco addiction
Full ArticleSmokers who crushed computer-simulated cigarettes as part of a psycho-social treatment programme in a virtual reality environment had significantly reduced nicotine dependence and higher rates of tobacco abstinence than smokers participating in the same programme who grasped a computer-simulated ball, according to a study described in the current issue of CyberPsychology and Behavior, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert Inc.
'ECG for the mind' could diagnose depression in an hour
Full ArticleAn innovative diagnostic technique invented by a Monash University researcher could dramatically fast-track the detection of mental and neurological illnesses. Monash biomedical engineer Brian Lithgow has developed electrovestibulography which is something akin to an "ECG for the mind". Patterns of electrical activity in the brain's vestibular (or balance) system are measured against distinct response patterns found in depression, schizophrenia and other Central Nervous System (CNS) disorders.
Health information exchange conquers new frontier: Emergency medical services
Full ArticleEmergency medical responders typically know very little about the patients they treat at mass disasters, accident scenes, or other sites where an ambulance is dispatched for rapid response. That's true everyplace in the United States except Indianapolis, the capital of the most health-wired state in the nation. Regenstrief Institute investigators are the first in the nation to link emergency medical services providers - emergency medical technicians (EMTs) or paramedics - in the field to patients' pre-existing health information, a link enabling the emergency workers to make more informed treatment decisions and to transport patients to the most appropriate facility.
Case Western Reserve University scientist builds imager that identifies and locates individual cancer cells
Full ArticleDave Wilson was dissatisfied with blurry, low-sensitivity optical images of diseased tissues. So, four years ago he set out to create a better imager. Now, David Wilson, a professor of biomedical engineering at Case Western Reserve University, can identify a single cancer cell in preclinical imaging studies. And he can pinpoint exactly where the cell is located in a three-dimensional image.
 
VMWC news bites
 
7thSense in rhythm with Chicago Museum of Science and Industry Giant Heart
Full ArticleCreative design house 7thSense, the specialist in AV media serving for visitor attractions, 3D theatres, planetariums and digital signage, has supplied four of its Delta media servers to the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago for the new Giant Heart within the "YOU! The Experience" exhibit, which opened October 8, 2009. A state-of-the-art AV installation using multiple projectors, the project imposed a unique set of technological demands, which obliged 7thSense to develop and customise Delta in very specific ways.
University of Delaware teams with Jefferson to win defense grant for imaging system
Full ArticleTwo faculty members in the University of Delaware's Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering are part of a team that was recently awarded an $849.000 grant from the Department of Defense to develop a three-dimensional projection environment for molecular design and surgical simulation. The award was made through the United States Army's Telemedicine & Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC).
Virtual solution to driving phobias
Full ArticleNervous drivers are being helped to overcome their road phobias by donning Cyclops-style goggles that transport them to a three-dimensional virtual world. Researchers at the University of Manchester have recruited volunteers with a variety of driving phobias to test whether virtual reality can be used alongside conventional psychological therapies to help tackle their fears. The Virtual Reality Exposure Treatment (VRET) will allow participants to drive on virtual roads and confront their fears, whether they might be driving over bridges, overtaking slow-moving traffic or taking to the motorway or dual-carriageway.
Is my robot happy to see me?
Full ArticlePeople are social creatures. Robots ... not so much. When we think of robots, we think of cold, metallic computers without emotion. If science fiction has taught us anything, though, it's that we crave emotion, even in our robots - think C-3PO or Star Trek's Data. So it stands to reason that if robots are ever going to become a fixture in our society, even becoming integrated into our households, we need to be able to read their faces. But how good are we at reading robot faces?
European hospitals test anaesthetists' skills on computers, not people, using SensAble's haptic devices
Full ArticleSensAble Technologies Inc.'s customer, the Cork University Hospital, is leading clinical trials in two European hospitals using a haptically-enabled computer simulation system for testing physician competency in administering spinal anaesthesia. SensAble is a manufacturer of haptic devices and toolkits, and its PHANTOM force-feedback haptic devices and programming technologies were used to develop this simulator. The clinical trials underway at Cork University Hospital in Ireland and the University of Pecs in Hungary explore whether virtual reality simulations can accurately assess high-risk clinical skills without the need for physicians to practise on patients.
 

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