Carnegie Mellon researchers receive grant to develop computerized tools for cryosurgery

Pittsburgh 09 December 2009Carnegie Mellon University's Yoed Rabin and Kenji Shimada have received a four-year, $1,3 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to develop computerized training tools for cryosurgery, which is the destruction of undesired tissue, such as cancerous tumours and organs, by freezing. At present, minimally invasive cryosurgery, such as prostate cryosurgery, is performed by inserting cryoprobes - in the shape of long hypodermic needles with a cooling tip - into the tumour. Cryoprobes placement and the following process of freezing are monitored by an imaging technique, such as ultrasound or MRI.

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Mechanical engineering professors Rabin and Shimada are developing an interactive simulator for the entire cryosurgical procedure, combined with a computerized tutor to evaluate the quality of simulated clinical cases.

"This is a revolutionary concept of enhancing surgical training by practising a virtual cryosurgical procedure", stated Yoed Rabin, who is leading this project and is an expert in biothermal technology. Yoed Rabin has been developing cryosurgical devices, research techniques and training methods for the past 18 years.

"While we have already developed rapid computer simulation techniques for cryosurgery and algorithms to help make better cryosurgery planning decisions, the challenge in the current project is to develop an interactive tool, which is capable of evaluating and comparing varying surgical scenarios", Yoed Rabin stated.

"It is like a video game. With our computerized training system, surgeons will be able to try out various cryoprobe placements without risk, visualize frozen regions with intuitive 3D computer graphics, and benchmark their performance with hundreds of cases stored in a database. It is a motivational and effective way of learning and improving their surgical skills", stated Kenji Shimada, who is an expert in computational modelling and simulation for product design, engineering analysis and factory automation.

While the developed computerized training tools are potentially applicable to all cryosurgical procedures, the current project is aimed at prostate cancer.

The American Cancer Society estimates that 192.280 new cases of prostate cancer will be diagnosed in the United States in 2009. Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in men, exceeded only by lung cancer. One in six men will get prostate cancer during his lifetime, and one in 35 will die of this disease.

Minimally invasive cryosurgery is one of the established applications to treat prostate cancer. "The combination of traditional training techniques with cost-effective computerized training tools can potentially be of high impact on the quality and cost of the cryosurgical treatment, and I am committed to its development and integration", Yoed Rabin stated.

Carnegie Mellon is a private, internationally ranked research university with programmes in areas ranging from science, technology and business, to public policy, the humanities and the fine arts. More than 11.000 students in the university's seven schools and colleges benefit from a small student-to-faculty ratio and an education characterized by its focus on creating and implementing solutions for real problems, interdisciplinary collaboration and innovation.

A global university, Carnegie Mellon's main campus in the United States is in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. It has campuses in California's Silicon Valley and Qatar, and programmes in Asia, Australia and Europe. The university is in the midst of a $1 billion fundraising campaign, titled "Inspire Innovation: The Campaign for Carnegie Mellon University", which aims to build its endowment, support faculty, students and innovative research, and enhance the physical campus with equipment and facility improvements.


Source: Carnegie Mellon University

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