HBSI selected as 1999 Computerworld Smithsonian Award finalist for its visionary use of IT in medicine

Bellevue 27 April 1999 The Computerworld Smithsonian Awards (CWSA) programme each year identifies and recognizes remarkable achievements of individuals as well as companies in their application of information technologies for the benefit and improvement of society. The established categories cover different fields, such as business, education, and medicine. For the 1999 award in medicine, HBS International has been selected as one of five finalists. This provider of outcomes management systems to the health care industry was nominated for the HBSI EXPLORE, a powerful clinical analysis and resource utilization database.

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The Computerworld Smithsonian Awards (CWSA) programme each year identifies and recognizes remarkable achievements of individuals as well as companies in their application of information technologies for the benefit and improvement of society. The established categories cover different fields, such as business, education, and medicine. For the 1999 award in medicine, HBS International has been selected as one of five finalists. This provider of outcomes management systems to the health care industry was nominated for the HBSI EXPLORE, a powerful clinical analysis and resource utilization database.

The CWSA organization received a total number of more than 450 nominations for 1999. An expert panel of judges with representatives from the information technology industry chose five finalists from each category. The final CWSA winners for each category will be announced at a gala dinner on June 7th 1999. The HBSI EXPLORE was nominated by Richard Egan, who is founder and chairman of EMC Corporation, a company that is specialized in the design of intelligent enterprise storage and retrieval technology. The HBSI company applies the enterprise storage technology, provided by EMC Corporation, for the HBSI EXPLORE database.

United States health care organizations are able to evaluate and compare all the details of clinical practice patterns, used by the physicians, with those of peer institutions and assess them in the light of industry norms. Over 250 data elements reside in the HBSI EXPLORE data warehouse for this purpose. As a result, all patient- and transaction-level information can be captured, in order to link health outcomes to the specific clinical processes and practice patterns. This type of detailed comparative analysis allows to enhance the overall clinical effectiveness, as well as to improve the quality of patient care while reducing costs at the same time.

At present, more than 160 health care organizations have been converted to the use of HBSI EXPLORE, which enables them to save millions of dollars on an annual basis. Advanced information technologies can handle the integral process of information gathering, analysis, and presentation of the complex data which are integrated in large volumes into HBSI EXPLORE every month by the health care institutions. HBSI applies a wide range of innovative tools to manage the data, including data warehousing, data reporting, as well as enterprise storage. EMC chairman Egan describes the role and impact of the HBSI EXPLORE information management and health care technology as very important for today's medical industry.

The case study material which HBSI company has submitted for the CSWA 1999 award, is currently part of the Smithsonian Institution's Permanent Research Collection on Information Technology at the National Museum of American History. You can access this data via the Web site of the Smithsonian Institute. For more information on the HBSI company, we refer you to the VMW article Patient perception surveys linked with outcomes management systems to optimize quality of care in the January 1999 issue.


Leslie Versweyveld

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