Virtual Interactive Anatomy project to generate responsive human body models

The Woodlands 09 July 1999 The Dynoverse Corporation has developed a unique technology which creates animated virtual models of the human body including bones, muscles, blood vessels and nerves. This Virtual Interactive Anatomy (VIA) project includes applications with advanced simulators for both surgical and clinical procedures. The software however can be extended to vehicle crash simulations and implemented in many industries ranging from defence and aerospace to entertainment and legal demonstrations.

Advertisement

The Dynoverse Corporation has developed a unique technology which creates animated virtual models of the human body including bones, muscles, blood vessels and nerves. This Virtual Interactive Anatomy (VIA) project includes applications with advanced simulators for both surgical and clinical procedures. The software however can be extended to vehicle crash simulations and implemented in many industries ranging from defence and aerospace to entertainment and legal demonstrations.

The VIA project has profoundly influenced the concept of human body modelling by offering one element which before was unthinkable of. We talk in this regard of user-defined functional realism of the human anatomy components beneath the surface features. With this project, the virtual body replicates physiology, including virtual blood circulation, muscle fatigue and joint mobility. From now on, VIA users will be able to simulate the human body's responses to real-life situations with novel interactive features.

As such, the VIA project includes three revolutionary functions. First, users have the ability to manipulate the human models with haptic devices, which allows medical students to use the VIA project for the practice of innovative surgical techniques while applying the latest instruments. As a result, they will experience realistic skin resistance and muscle density. Second, there is the power to adjust anatomic and physiologic parameters by simply keying in numeric values.

With this tool, researchers can model patients with high blood pressure or a paralytic condition to follow the outcomes of treatments or medications. In third place, VIA users are able to create real-life simulations of conditions otherwise unavailable. One can imagine, for example, the case of scientists who might build environments with Martian weather, in order to place the virtual human in a space suit as to evaluate issues such as safety, comfort and mobility.

Computer and related technology advances are provided at affordable costs to set the stage for virtual reality to revolutionize how we visualize, interact with, and learn from available information about the human body. The VIA project thus is setting a new standard for how life-like and responsive virtual humans can be, according to Robert Rice, CEO of Dynoverse. His company's business is at the cutting edge of both computer and biomedical sciences, but there is limited awareness of the power, value and interactivity of virtual reality.

In this high stakes environment, PricewaterhouseCoopers' Intellectual Asset Management Group has been an invaluable advisory and planning resource, as stated by Robert Rice. In turn, Bowen Loftin, who is director of VETL, the Virtual Environments Research Institute at the University of Houston, claims that VIA's human modelling programme has the unique capacity to combine surface and internal realism with unparalleled mobility and interactivity. The technological advances will certainly have a tremendous impact on future virtual environment technology applications, according to his conviction.

Dynoverse Corporation is affiliated with the CAESAR project, a consortium of government agencies, the Society of Automotive Engineers, and supporting corporations. This programme is collecting precise data about the shapes and dimensions of a representative demographic and geographic sample of the population for various research and product design applications. The VIA project development is performed under contract with VETI, the Virtual Environment Technology Institute.

The Dynoverse Corporation holds exclusive rights to license or sell the VIA technology intellectual property for its commercial applications. A patent application for VIA human tissue modelling algorithms currently is pending in the United States Patent and Trademark Office.


Leslie Versweyveld

[Medical IT News][Calendar][Virtual Medical Worlds Community][News on Advanced IT]