SensiCath technology licensed to measure arterial blood gas of patients in shock

Minneapolis 24 July 1998 The Institute of Critical Care Medicine in Palm Springs, a not for profit institution founded to advance both life-saving and life-sustaining medical care, has decided to sign a license agreement with Optical Sensors, a designer of arterial blood gas (ABG) monitoring systems, which is based in Minnesota. This gives the company a right to commercialize all pending and issued patents of the Californian Institute with regard to the techniques of sub-lingual measuring of intra-mucosal CO2. This method is used to assess tissue perfusion, which is extremely valuable for the diagnosis and treatment of patients in shock.

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The Institute of Critical Care Medicine in Palm Springs, a not for profit institution founded to advance both life-saving and life-sustaining medical care, has decided to sign a license agreement with Optical Sensors, a designer of arterial blood gas (ABG) monitoring systems, which is based in Minnesota. This gives the company a right to commercialize all pending and issued patents of the Californian Institute with regard to the techniques of sub-lingual measuring of intra-mucosal CO2. This method is used to assess tissue perfusion, which is extremely valuable for the diagnosis and treatment of patients in shock.

Since 1993, the Optical Sensors Company has put a lot of effort in the development of an optical sensor technology platform. This research has resulted into a fully integrated system, consisting of both the SensiCath Sensor and the OpticalCAM, for non-invasive ABG measurement results in only 60 seconds, preventing the patient from the risk to be exposed to infectious blood as well as from depletion of blood supply.

Chief Executive Officer Sam Humphries states that the reduction of blood flow to the internal organs of the gastro-intestinal area usually constitutes the first indication for patient shock. Rapid under-the-tongue measurement of carbon dioxide can save the lives of critically ill or badly injured patients. The company anticipates that the global market for this type of innovative technology easily might exceed an annual turnover of 1 billion dollar.

In addition, the ABG measurement tools will be applied in emergency room and intensive care units, as well as in nursing homes and ambulances. Efficient use of the ABG monitoring platform will amount to spectacular cost savings in critical health care because the patients will far sooner be able to leave the expensive intensive care units.

President of the Institute of Critical Care Medicine, Dr. Harry Weil, even predicts the useful implementation of the SensiCath and OpticalCAM configuration for soldiers on the battlefield and for victims in mass disasters. The Optical Sensors' and Institute's partnership has resulted in the recent formation of a team, consisting of principal investigators, in order to perform clinical evaluations with regard to the patient-connected ABG monitoring system. These investigations will already start before the end of this year.


Leslie Versweyveld

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