VMW Monthly - July 1998 - ISSN 1388-722X


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Contents July 1998 Issue

 
atlantic
 
Fly like an eagle with virtual reality therapy
Yale's human anatomy study highlights Internet2 performance
Do telemedicine programmes have to be profitable?
American nurses play major role in the establishment of telehealth guidelines
Help tools transform video systems into full-fledged telemedicine gear
NASA and Yale, partners in commercial telemedicine
 
Euromed
 
A VRML Based 3D Visualization and Sonification Environment
 
hospital
 
Integrated health care network optimises patient care at Maimonides Medical Centre
Accuracy of remote cardiology consults equals face-to-face examination
Dutch hospital waiting list surveys about to appear on the Web
Project Phoenix shows value of telemedicine for renal therapy
NOVICE project aims at providing hospitals with HPCN-based visualisation tools
Oncology congress participants discuss ovarian cancer treatment through satellite connection
Health care organizations start using Internet to measure outcomes
 
industrial
 
TV Set-Top Internet Access Device enables cost-effective home telemedicine solution
Cruise ship launches "On Board Virtual Emergency Room"
Digital dog tag invention inspires DoD to launch a Personal Information Carrier bid
Clinical Systems Integration Centre supports testing of new drugs
Internet allows remote medical image viewing through advanced teleradiology system
Telemedicine network links Everest climbers live with ground level
 
planet
 
HPCN in neural network applications for industry and medicine
Towards a new health care approach in the future Information Society
Assessing the health care project outcomes in the Fourth Framework Programme
High thresholds cause slow IT breakthrough in health care
How can SME's make European business in health care information technology?
HPCN technology enables perfect 3D view of the heart geometry
 
snap
 
Mobile Assistant revolutionizes wearable computing world
Chernobyl patients remotely diagnosed by Japanese specialists
Psychiatric patients not patronized but really helped via Internet
Telemedicine provides more psychological than economical benefits
Health Online starts telehomecare service in Singapore
Digital picture diagnosis saves life of African islanders
Advanced health care marketing discussed in Hawaii
 

Leads July 1998 Issue

 
atlantic
 
Fly like an eagle with virtual reality therapy
Full Article The sheer sight of an aircraft can leave some people with cold sweat hands and even make them sick. Flying phobia usually is treated by means of gradual exposure to the feared experience. At the California School of Professional Psychology (CSPP), Brenda Wiederhold is the director of a new Centre for Advanced Multimedia Psychotherapy, where she uses integrated models of training to treat psychophysiological and psychological disorders. She recently has developed a programme combining real-time physiological monitoring with virtual reality graded exposure therapy to turn frightened people into confident and relaxed flight travellers in only eight sessions.
Yale's human anatomy study highlights Internet2 performance
Full Article Last april, the incredible speed of data travel over Internet2 has been demonstrated at the National Internet2 Members Conference in Washington D.C. Together with the National Library of Medicine (NLM), the University of Yale has set up a study of human anatomy. This project was chosen as one of the showcase applications to put Internet2 through its paces with regard to its promising high-speed exchange capacities of three-dimensional medical images. The National Science Foundation (NSF) has been funding Internet2 to fill the need for an advanced research network. The successful implementation of Internet2 for scientific purposes might even provoke a call for Internet3.
Do telemedicine programmes have to be profitable?
Full Article The concept of telemedicine is fairly young. Yet, in the United States, health care providers start to worry about the profitability aspect of the telemedical implementation. They first wanted to prove whether is was possible to deliver remote health care through networking facilities, in which they have succeeded. Now, they are busy trying to collect hard figures to show that telemedicine optimises the quality of care, while reducing costs at the same time. Unfortunately, this is no evidence of intrinsic profitability, because the programme itself might turn a loss. Some experts plead for the introduction of a special standard by which telemedical programmes are judged profitable as long as they serve the specific objectives of the entire health care organization. Others stick to a strict business approach, claiming the programme should make money in its own right.
American nurses play major role in the establishment of telehealth guidelines
Full Article Since 1996, the American Nurses Association (ANA) has been actively involved in the development of guidelines for telemedical practices. Professional nurses are omnipresent in the field of telehomecare in the United States, where distant, isolated, underserved rural areas are typical factors to be taken into account for the delivery of qualitative health care. The organization has declared multistate licensure for registered nurses as a key item to be dealt with in 1998. As a result, it is scheduled as one of the main topics at the ANA Biennal Convention, which takes place in San Diego at the end of June.
Help tools transform video systems into full-fledged telemedicine gear
Full Article Video systems have the potential to pay large services with regard to high quality image provision in teleconsultations between physicians and specialists or between physicians and patients. However, a few important conditions need to be fulfilled in order to benefit to the full extent of both the material and intellectual resources which telemedicine has to offer with regard to accurate diagnosis. Electronic interaction or store-and-forward traffic between two sites implies competent operators and excellent voice and image quality. Currently, there exists a range of specialized components which can be inserted between the video source and the transmission medium to enhance the transfer quality of anatomical data, radiology scans, ultrasound, infrared images, pathology specimens, ECG traces, and so on.
NASA and Yale, partners in commercial telemedicine
Full Article In July 1997, the University of Yale and NASA have started a partnership for the development and testing of next generation technologies in the telemedicine domain. Their latest project involved the health condition follow up of four mountain climbers, who reached Mount Everest's summit last May. Through NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS), a telecommunications bridge has been installed between Mount Everest and the participating research institutions. The expedition formed an excellent opportunity to try out some innovative health care devices, based on space science technology. Mountain climbers indeed are exposed to huge medical challenges similar to astronauts in a space shuttle.
 
Euromed
 
A VRML Based 3D Visualization and Sonification Environment
Full Article At the ITIS'98 Conference, Emil Jovanov, professor at the Institute "Mihajlo Pupin", University of Belgrade, presented a demo version of a 3D EEG visualization and sonification environment. Professor Jovanov and his research team developed a telemedical software package based on VRML and Java technologies, in the overall framework of the Euromed project. This work introduces different views on the same EEG record using Virtual Medical Devices (VMD). This concept takes advantage of recent investigations in the field of Virtual Reality User Interfaces (VRUI).
 
hospital
 
Integrated health care network optimises patient care at Maimonides Medical Centre
Full Article Hospitals all over the world are focused on two burning issues in this decade of health care reorganization: improvement of patient treatment outcomes and overall cost reduction. Since 1995, the Maimonides Medical Centre in Brooklyn, New York, is working together with Unisys on an integrated health care delivery solution, referred to as the Maimonides Access Clinical System or MACS. This clinical support services system has been nominated as one of six finalists in the Medicine category of the 1998 Computerworld Smithsonian Awards, which every year honour the most remarkable information technology initiatives for the general improvement of society.
Accuracy of remote cardiology consults equals face-to-face examination
Full Article At the East Carolina University (ECU), a double-blind study has been organized during one year to test the effectiveness of teleconsultation in the evaluation of paediatric heart patients. The research project has been set up to convince cardiologists that modern videoconferencing tools are just as reliable as live patient consultation to obtain a correct diagnosis. It might even save costs by helping the physician decide to suppress the production of superfluous echocardiograms. Although the study showed an almost 100% accuracy for the remote diagnoses, the ECU researchers insist that it is not proven whether telemedicine offers the same quality of service as face-to-face examination. Due to insufficient transmission speeds, acoustic and image data are inferior to the real-time echo and stethoscope outcomes.
Dutch hospital waiting list surveys about to appear on the Web
Full Article The enormous length of hospital waiting lists for treatment and rehabilitation has become a severe problem in the Netherlands. The Dutch Federation of Patients and Consumers Organizations (NP/CF) wants to address the issue by using the Internet as a dissemination tool for waiting list surveys of all major Dutch hospitals. By the end of 1998, the NP/CF staff plans to start up a Web site with detailed information on waiting terms for each medical specialization. According to the Automatisering Gids, the public will have general access to this site in order to compare waiting times between the different hospitals.
Project Phoenix shows value of telemedicine for renal therapy
Full Article At Georgetown University Medical Centre (GUMC), a three-year project is running, which studies the impact of telemedicine services on the condition of renal dialysis patients. The National Library of Medicine has offered a grant of $2.8 million to the Project Phoenix, that started off in October 1996 and will end in March 1999. The ultimate purpose is to prove that chronic illnesses are ideally manageable through electronic interactive communication between physicians and patients. The quality of care is being intensified to everyone's satisfaction, whereas the costs for permanent treatment are substantially being lowered. In addition, accessibility and security within Phoenix are superior to the paper-based system.
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